Brian Elmore Becomes First Horsemen’s Group Executive Named Jockeys and Jeans Ambassador

As the Vice President of Racing for Centaur Gaming, owner and operator of Indiana Grand Racing and Casino in 2015, Elmore worked to make the Jockeys and Jeans Fundraiser held there for the Permanently Disabled Jockeys Fund a huge success! “Brian helped formulate a plan to make our event a real moneymaker, and for that I am eternally grateful”, stated Barry Pearl, President of Jockeys and Jeans. Elmore was recognized and presented with the prestigious Eddie Arcaro Award by the National Jockeys Guild for his outstanding service to the industry and work for the betterment of jockeys at Gulfstream Park in 2016.

Elmore presently serves as the Executive Director of the Indiana HBPA representing over 2,000 men and women who own and race thoroughbred horses in Indiana. Elmore, on behalf of the Indiana HBPA, presented a $10,000  check during this year’s annual fundraiser event held at Santa Anita Park in June. At that event Elmore took the stage and gave a passionate speech on behalf of permanently disabled jockeys. He was clearly affected by the death of 17 year old jockey Juan Saez in a racing incident in October of 2014 and was at the hospital when Juan died, and as Elmore stated, “Juan went to ride with the angels”. Juan was the younger brother of successful jockey Luis Saez and was following in his brothers footsteps. According to Jockey Guild statistics, Juan was the 153rd jockey killed in racing incidents since 1940.

Elmore pledged to work with the PDJF, the Jockeys Guild, and other organizations to improve the funding for some 60 permanently disabled riders who have not received any increases in their $1,000  monthly stipend in 13 years. “We have a problem in this industry and it is establishing a permanent funding mechanism for our disabled jockeys. Also, we need to ensure that there is adequate life insurance available for riders who pay the ultimate price and lose their life while performing their craft. It is difficult enough for family and loved ones to deal with the loss of a family member, the last thing they need to worry about is how they will financially move forward and provide for their families. The reason our industry needs to resolve these issues is simple, DO THE RIGHT THING!”

Pearl said, “Brian’s speech brought home the need to support permanently disabled jockeys and touched the hearts of all that heard it.” Pearl added, “horse people like Brian see up close racing accidents and understand all too well the plight of disabled riders.” Pearl continued, “ this year 21 horsemen’s groups from around the nation proved they care by donating to our event and we are extremely grateful to all. We could not have elevated our cause to the level we are now without numerous individuals donating their time and resources and organizations like the Indiana HBPA in which Elmore serves.

Elmore joins two-time Triple Crown winning and Hall of Fame trainer Bob Baffert  as the only non-jockey Ambassadors who agree to use their platforms to promote and raise awareness of the inherent risks of horse racing for jockeys and develop a revenue stream for permanent funding along with events like Jockeys and Jeans and other PDJF fundraisers for those who have suffered catastrophic, career ending injuries in racing accidents.

Jockeys and Jeans is an all volunteer group, founded by former jockeys, who have raised over $1.2 million for the PDJF in less than six years.

News and Views

For Immediate Release Wednesday July 3, 2019

 

Jockeys and Jeans Raises over $200,000 for the Permanently Disabled Jockeys Fund at Santa Anita Event

 

The proceeds have been tallied and the sixth annual Jockeys and Jeans fundraiser for the Permanently Disabled Jockeys Fund, this year on Saturday June 22, raised $205,000.

 

The event featured a speech by two-time Triple Crown winning trainer Bob Baffert who received Jockeys and Jeans first Person of the Year Award. Baffert took the stage and spoke of the need to support severely injured former jockeys and entertained the crowd with stories about his short and far from lucrative career as a jockey.

 

“I got kicked out of the Jockeys’ Guild because I didn’t ride enough races in a year,” he said. Baffert told about riding a Quarter Horse in a 660 yard race with a purse of $600.00. “It got tight and I pulled my horse out of a tiny hole. The trainer asked me about it and I told him, ‘I didn’t need the $30 that badly.’ Even today when some jockeys’ agents ask me to use their riders, I tell them I can’t because they look too much like me on a horse when I rode.”

 

Fifteen Hall of Fame riders signed autographs during a morning session open to all track patrons and a dozen later mingled with the crowd and met personally with the seven honored guests, catastrophically injured former riders to listen and offer encouragement. Leah Whitesell, a former trainer now a principle in a New Jersey veterinary clinic, received the group’s first Uphill Push Award for working tirelessly to purchase and drive a wheelchair assessable van 1,100 miles to long-time paraplegic former jockey Vincent Amico. Hall of Fame Jockey Christ McCarron also spoke about the need to support severely injured riders.

 

 Stronach Group’s Chief Strategy Officer, Aidan Butler and its COO, Tim Ritvo attended the event, with Ritvo taking the podium to speak about the his own career as a jockey and the need to support PDJF. Both purchased several auction items. This was the second event hosted by a Stronach Group track and both executives said the event would be welcome at their other tracks. 

 

“The bottom line is this, Jockeys and Jeans will be doing another event at one of the Stronach Groups tracks in the future,” said the group’s president, Barry Pearl. “So many there worked hard to make the event a success and it’s obvious they genuinely care about catastrophically injured jockeys.”

 

Jack Fires, 63, and a paraplegic since a racing accident at the defunct River Downs at 21, was attending his third fundraiser. “I know all of us (injured riders) feel good about being recognized,” said the PDJF Board Member. “A lot of us can’t make it to the track anymore and this is a way to be involved in something that at one time was a big part of our lives. And I think it’s a way for the Hall of Fame jockeys and everyone else to get familiar with the folks they are helping. All of us enjoyed being there.”

 

Jockeys and Jeans, founded in late 2014 by a group of former jockeys, has raised over $1.2 million for the PDJF. 

 

For more information contact Eddie Donnally (818) 653-3711 edjockeysandjean.com. wwwjockeysandjeans.com

Jockeys and Jeans Ambassadors in the news.

Bob Baffert Becomes the Only Trainer Appointed a Jockeys and Jeans Ambassador

Bob Baffert, the only living trainer to win two Triple Crowns, has become an official Ambassador,

representing the group founded by former jockeys who in four years have raised over $1 million for

Permanently Disabled Jockeys Fund. An Ambassador helps with negotiations with track

management, fundraising, and personally advocates for jockeys as they rebuild their lives following

catastrophic, career ending injuries.

He joins Hall of Fame Ambassadors Ron Turcotte, Laffit Pincay, Jr., Chris McCarron, Jorge

Velasquez and active riders, Edgar Prado, Javier Castellano and Mike Smith.

“I met Bob in his office at his barn at Santa Anita and discussed the role of a Jockeys and Jeans

Ambassador,” said the group’s President, Barry Pearl “Without hesitation, Bob turned and looked at

me and said, ‘I would be proud to accept such an honor.’”

Baffert donated $50,000 to PDJF and three other racing related charities after he agreed to accept a

reported $200,000 to allow the Burger-King to be filmed behind him before American Pharaoh won

the 2015 Belmont Stake and completed his Triple Crown sweep. He has quietly donated since and on

Tuesday, Oct. 30 at the second annual Equestricon in Louisville, KY, Baffert, along with other

connections of 2018 Triple Crown winner Justify—jockey Mike Smith, WinStar Farm President,

Elliott Walden, and part owner Jack Wolf—spent over two hours signing autographs to

benefit the PDJF.

 

“I was once a jockey so I know how important it is to support fallen riders,” Baffert said after the

marathon signing. “I’ve hit the ground a few times myself.”

Baffert, who grew up in Nogales, AZ, started riding match races near his home as an early teen,

earning as much as $100 a day, and in 1970 won his first sanctioned race as a Quarter Horse jockey

at a Flagstaff, AZ track. Though he soon outgrew the saddle, he started his training career with

Quarter Horses, racing at Los Alamitos Racetrack in Southern, CA. He dedicated his 2015 Triple

Crown victory to his 1980’s go-to rider there, Bobby Adair, who died in May of the same year at 71.

Baffert and the late “Sunny Jim” Fitzsimmons are the only trainers to win two Triple Crowns and

Baffert has won a record 15 Triple Crown races. Elected to the Hall of Fame in 2009, he has won

Four Eclipse Awards as top trainer, 15 Breeders’ Cup races and its Classic a record three times.

 

“I truly stand amazed that so many of racing’s stars have made a decision to stand with us and add to

our efforts to help those who are no longer riding racehorses, but wheelchairs,” said Pearl. “It shows

that racing is not just a business but a community and a truly caring family.”

Jockeys and Jeans, formed in 2014, is an all volunteer group which raises funds through a yearly

event and stallion season sale. All funds raised go directly to the PDJF, which makes monthly

payments of $1,000 to some 60 permanently disabled former jockeys, including some 40 who are

quadri or paraplegics.

 

For more information contact President Barry Pearl at JockeysandJeans@gmail.com (717-503-0182)

or VP Marketing, Eddie Donnally at eddonnally@gmail.com (818-653-3711), website

www.jockeysandjeans.com

Available on Amazon and Kindle and by order from any bookstore or library, it is set in 1972 at the beginning of horse racing’s Golden Age. A once barred jockey battling addiction, the fledgling female trainer he loves, and her criminal father race a mysterious, super- talented horse with no legal papers all the way to the Kentucky Derby while a crusading track detective is fixated on foiling their ringer scheme and putting them in jail. 

His bio, Ride the White Horse: A Checkered Jockeys Story of Racing, Rage, and Redemption, has sold some 6,000 copies and has 40 four or five star reviews on Amazon. His first novel, Doctrines of Demons sold well and he has shared his end time prophesy on a dozen media outlets. This time he is back in the familiar territory of Thoroughbred racing with The Golden Altar. 

In his 19-years as a jockey, Donnally rode over 10,000 races winning nearly 1200. But he was far better known as a racing writer and is the only former jockey to win an Eclipse Award for Newspaper Writing, for the Dallas Morning News in 1984. He has published well over 100 articles in a score of newspapers and magazines, including the Washington Post, New York Times and their Sunday Magazine.

Today, he holds a Doctorate of Ministry and is a professional hospice and hospital chaplain in Clearwater, FL. His testimony of faith has been published in magazines and books, including Chicken Soup for the Recovering Soul” discussed on radio shows and featured on The 700 Club” and the CTN’s Herman and Sharron Show. He is a frequent speaker in churches, recovery conferences, rehab centers, and prisons.

He will also write and distribute a monthly blog, Scene from the Saddle, on racing’s issues and trends from the jockeys’ perspective. His website is eddonnally.com.

Donnally is Vice President of Jockeys and Jeans, a group of former jockeys he helped start in 2014 that thus far has raised over $1 million for catastrophically injured jockeys through the Permanently Disabled Jockeys Fund.

For more information contact Eddie Donnally at 818-653-3711 or eddie@eddonnally.com.

Racing has lost one of its brightest stars, but heaven has gained a new jockey

by Barry Pearl, President Jockeys and Jeans. 

 

 

It has been over 50 years since I first met Manny Ycaza, I was a bright-eyed apprentice and Manny was a full-fledged super star. One thing I learned about Manny that while he was competitive as he was on the track, he was always willing to talk and help young riders. 

 

He was a true gentleman and carried himself with dignity and class. Although we rode together and exchanged pleasantries, one would not call us close friends, as we were from different time periods.  I used to watch riders like Manny and Walter Blum, John Rotz and others and was always amazed at their ability and talent. 

 

Manny rode many greats of his era and perhaps any era; Horses like, Dr. Fager, Damascus, Sword Dancer, Intentionally, Bald Eagle, Never Bend, Gamely, Bowl of Flowers, Dark Mirage and Fort Marcy.

 

In 2016 when Jockeys and Jeans was heading to Gulfstream Park, we contacted Manny and invited to be one of our guest Hall of Fame riders. Manny jumped at the chance and he even traveled from his native Panama, where he was spending the winter. On stage at the event, he and John Rotz relived the infamous 1962 Preakness battle at Pimlico with Manny on Ridan and Rotz aboard the photo finish winner Greek Money. That created a memory for me I will always treasure. 

 

I had the opportunity to discuss Jockeys and Jeans with Manny after our event and was impressed by his many great suggest